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July 23 - August 8th, 2021 / Tokyo, Japan

2020 Olympic Games

Next Race Countdown
Opening Ceremony
49er Racers
49erFX Racers
Nacra17 Racers
News
About Tokyo
Event Program
Notice Board
Photos
Press

2020 49er Olympics

CountCountryQualification MethodHelmCrewNotes
1JapanHost NationLeo TakahashiIbuki KoizumiWon internal qualification
2CroatiaTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusSime FantelaMihovil FantelaSime won 470 gold at Rio 2016
2018 49er World Champions
3FranceTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusEmile AmorosLucas RualWon internal qualification
4GermanyTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusErik HeilThomas PloesselBig lead in internal Germany qualifier. Bronze medal in 2016.
5Great BritainTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusDylan FletcherStuart Bithell2017 World Champions
6New ZealandTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusPeter BurlingBlair TukeRio 2016 Gold Medal
6x 49er World Champions
7PortugalTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusJorge LimaJose Costa3x Olympians
8SwitzerlandTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusSebastien SchneiterLucean CujeanHit Swiss qualification at 2020 Worlds
9DenmarkTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusJonas WarrerJakob Precht JensenJonas Warrer - Beijing 2008 Gold Medal
10SpainTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 WorldsDiego BotinIago Marra2nd at 2020 World Championship
11AustriaTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 WorldsBen BildsteinDavid Hussl3rd at 2019 World Championship
12NetherlandsTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 WorldsBart LambriexPim van VugtNot yet named by Dutch Olympic team, must meet national qualification criteria.
13PolandTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 Worlds
14CanadaNorth American continental place
15BrazilSouth American continental placeMarco GraelGabriel BorgesMade internal selection criteria at 2020 Worlds
16AustraliaOceania continental placeWill PhillipsSam PhillipsMade Australian criteria at 2020 Worlds
17TBDAsian continental placeTBD
18TBDEuropean continental placeTBD
19TBDAfrican continental placeTBD

2020 49er Olympics

CountCountryQualification MethodHelmCrewNotes
1JapanHost NationLeo TakahashiIbuki KoizumiWon internal qualification
2CroatiaTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusSime FantelaMihovil FantelaSime won 470 gold at Rio 2016
2018 49er World Champions
3FranceTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusEmile AmorosLucas RualWon internal qualification
4GermanyTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusErik HeilThomas PloesselBig lead in internal Germany qualifier. Bronze medal in 2016.
5Great BritainTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusDylan FletcherStuart Bithell2017 World Champions
6New ZealandTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusPeter BurlingBlair TukeRio 2016 Gold Medal
6x 49er World Champions
7PortugalTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusJorge LimaJose Costa3x Olympians
8SwitzerlandTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusSebastien SchneiterLucean CujeanHit Swiss qualification at 2020 Worlds
9DenmarkTop 8 nations at 2018 Worlds AarhusJonas WarrerJakob Precht JensenJonas Warrer - Beijing 2008 Gold Medal
10SpainTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 WorldsDiego BotinIago Marra2nd at 2020 World Championship
11AustriaTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 WorldsBen BildsteinDavid Hussl3rd at 2019 World Championship
12NetherlandsTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 WorldsBart LambriexPim van VugtNot yet named by Dutch Olympic team, must meet national qualification criteria.
13PolandTop 4 remaining nations at 2019 Worlds
14CanadaNorth American continental place
15BrazilSouth American continental placeMarco GraelGabriel BorgesMade internal selection criteria at 2020 Worlds
16AustraliaOceania continental placeWill PhillipsSam PhillipsMade Australian criteria at 2020 Worlds
17TBDAsian continental placeTBD
18TBDEuropean continental placeTBD
19TBDAfrican continental placeTBD
Back to overview

Story by Yachting New Zealand

Sandy Dawson and Ulrika Silfverberg never thought they would find rubbish so fascinating, and rewarding.

The pair can often be found sorting through the bins at the Royal Akarana Yacht Club, making sure rubbish has been disposed of correctly, and they’re mostly encouraged about what they find.

Dawson and Silfverberg, along with Debbie Meech, are the mainstays of the green team attached to the Hyundai 49er, 49erFX and Nacra 17 World Championships. It’s a role they take very seriously and, like the sailors, have targets around what they want to achieve this week.

The world championships is one of only five regattas this year likely to achieve platinum status, the highest possible achievement against a set of criteria created by Sailors for the Sea.

“The regatta organisers decided right at the beginning that they wanted to have a clean regatta and aim for a platinum status,” Dawson explains. “There are not many regattas who have done that level and it’s hard to achieve. We need to meet 70 out of 75 requirements and we are on track. There are a couple of tricky ones but there are other things we are doing over and above.

“We say we are a clean and green country and you have to put your actions where your mouth is and prove it.”

There have been many aspects to the environmental push, from the ghost fishing weekend when rubbish on the seabed in Okahu Bay was picked up by divers to a beach cleanup, compostable cutlery, absence of single use plastics and blue fish embedded beside drains in the boat park to remind sailors about runoff.

“It was daunting at the beginning and you thought, ‘gosh, how am I going to do all of that?’ Silfverberg says. “But you break it down to each item and you realise you can achieve all of that. 

“Nothing has been really hard. It’s actually been quite fun.”

It has helped that the Royal Akarana Yacht Club were totally on board with the idea and considered sustainability when undergoing their club rebuild. They looked to use sustainable materials and any contractors employed by the club need to meet certain standards.

The green team’s message also seems to be sinking in with sailors and coaches, although some are more engaged than others.

“We look in the rubbish bins and they still need to learn to sort the rubbish out and not be lazy about it,” Silfverberg says. “Others go up to the closest bin and throw it in. At least it’s not going on the ground.”

Dawson added: “There’s definitely different levels of take-up. If each sailor can leave with a little more knowledge and improve a little more in their processes, that’s a good thing.”

The green team also hope to create a toolkit for yacht clubs around the country to utlilise. They realise very few could achieve platinum status right now but hope to encourage clubs to set targets of their own.

Yachting New Zealand have also developed an environmental strategy and have some ideas for clubs to be more sustainable.

“It would be really good to create a basic blueprint to make it easier for a club looking for a way to do things,” Dawson said. “There’s no point doing this and then stopping afterwards.”